The Forgotten Constitution: The Natural Resources Transfer Agreements and Indian Livelihood Rights, Ca. 1925-1933

  • Frank J. Tough

Abstract

This article forms Part I of a two part legal-historical analysis of the Natural Resources Transfer Agreement (NRTA), the processes and circumstances that gave rise to its enactment, and the subsequent implications historical and contemporary —for the livelihood rights of Aboriginal peoples. In this Part, the author critically examines historical evidence surrounding the agreements that the Prairie Provinces of Alberta, Manitoba, and Saskatchewan entered into with the Dominion government. In doing so, the author concludes that, to date, legal interpretations of the NRTA and the respective provincial agreements have been short-sighted and incomplete. As such, they are deeply troubling and represent a site for further critical legal analysis and judicial reconsideration.
How to Cite
Tough, F. J. (1). The Forgotten Constitution: The Natural Resources Transfer Agreements and Indian Livelihood Rights, Ca. 1925-1933. Alberta Law Review, 41(4), 999. https://doi.org/10.29173/alr1316
Section
Forum: Metis and Treaty Rights