Crookes v. Newton: The Supreme Court of Canada Brings Libel Law into the Internet Age

  • Iris Fischer Lawyer, Litigation and Dispute Resolution Group of Blake, Cassels & Graydon LLP, Toronto, Ontario
  • Adam Lazier Lawyer, Litigation and Dispute Resolution Group of Blake, Cassels & Graydon LLP, Toronto, Ontario

Abstract

After paying little attention to defamation law for decades, in the last few years the Supreme Court of Canada has begun to reshape the field. In what has been described as the “constitutionalization” of defamation law, the Court has recently recognized that the common law was out of step with the right to freedom of expression guaranteed by the Canadian Charter of Rights and Freedoms. This process began in 2008 with the Court’s decision in WIC Radio v. Simpson, which clarified and expanded the scope of the fair comment defence. The Court went further the following year with Grant v. Torstar Corp, which recognized an entirely new defence of responsible communication on matters of public interest.
How to Cite
Fischer, I., & Lazier, A. (1). Crookes v. Newton: The Supreme Court of Canada Brings Libel Law into the Internet Age. Alberta Law Review, 50(1), 205-218. https://doi.org/10.29173/alr276
Section
Case Comments